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The World Community
for Christian Meditation

The World Community for Christian Meditation
is an international organisation of meditators
whose practice of this universal tradition is
rooted in theteachings of the Gospels and
the early Christian monastic methods of
prayer and contemplation.
Forgotten over the centuries, this aspect of
Christian spirituality in the life of the Church was
rediscovered and revived by Fr. John Main, OSB
(1926-1982), a Benedictine monk
who in the 1970s
reintroduced it into the lives of religious
and lay people alike. Here in New Zealand
there are meditation groups in many cities
and towns meeting regularly in churches,
community halls and private homes.
To find out more visit
www.christianmeditationnz.org.nz





READINGS for:
17th June 2018 - 11th Sunday in Ordinary Time

Ezekiel 17:22-24; Psalm 91; Corinthians 5:6-10; Mark 4:26-34
Ezekiel 17:22-24; Psalm 91; Corinthians 5:6-10; Mark 4:26-34

FIRST READING: Ezekiel 17:22-24

image I make the low trees grow.

The Lord says this:
‘From the top of the cedar, from the highest branch I will take a shoot and plant it myself on a very high mountain.
I will plant it on the high mountain of Israel.
It will sprout branches and bear fruit, and become a noble cedar.
Every kind of bird will live beneath it, every winged creature rest in the shade of its branches.
And every tree of the field will learn that I, the Lord, am the one who stunts tall trees and makes the low ones grow, who withers green trees and makes the withered green.
I, the Lord, have spoken, and I will do it.’

The Word of the Lord.


Psalm 91:2-3. 13-16

Response: It is good to give you thanks, O Lord.
or - Alleluia!

1. It is good to give thanks to the Lord
to make music to your name, O Most High,
to proclaim your love in the morning
and your truth in the watches of the night. - Response

2. The just will flourish like the palm-tree
and grow like a Lebanon cedar. - Response

3. Planted in the house of the Lord
they will flourish in the courts of our God,
still bearing fruit when they are old,
still full of sap, still green,
to proclaim that the Lord is just.
In him, my rock, there is no wrong. - Response


SECOND READING: St Paul to the Corinthians 5:6-10

Whether we are living in the body or exiled from it, we are intent on pleasing the Lord.

We are always full of confidence when we remember that to live in the body means to be exiled from the Lord, going as we do by faith and not by sight – we are full of confidence, I say, and actually want to be exiled from the body and make our home with the Lord. Whether we are living in the body or exiled from it, we are intent on pleasing him. For all the truth about us will be brought out in the law court of Christ, and each of us will get what he deserves for the things he did in the body, good or bad.

The Word of the Lord.


GOSPEL ACCLAMATION : Jn 15:15

Alleluia, alleluia!
I call you friends, says the Lord,
because I have made known to you
everything I have learnt from my Father.
Alleluia!


GOSPEL : Mark 4:26-34

It is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet once it is sown it grows into the biggest shrub of them all.

Jesus said to the crowds: ‘This is what the kingdom of God is like. A man throws seed on the land. Night and day, while he sleeps, when he is awake, the seed is sprouting and growing; how, he does not know. Of its own accord the land produces first the shoot, then the ear, then the full grain in the ear. And when the crop is ready, he loses no time: he starts to reap because the harvest has come.’

He also said, ‘What can we say the kingdom of God is like? What parable can we find for it? It is like a mustard seed which at the time of its sowing in the soil is the smallest of all the seeds on earth; yet once it is sown it grows into the biggest shrub of them all and puts out big branches so that the birds of the air can shelter in its shade.’

Using many parables like these, he spoke the word to them, so far as they were capable of understanding it. He would not speak to them except in parables, but he explained everything to his disciples when they were alone.

The Gospel of the Lord.










Readings from The Jerusalem Bible © 1966 by Darton Longman & Todd Ltd and Doubleday and Company Ltd.
Psalm © The Grail (England) published by HarperCollins.



Understanding the Liturgical Cycle

The Lectionary is arranged into two cycles, one for Sundays and one for weekdays. The Sunday cycle is divided into three years, labeled A, B, and C. 2005 was Year A, 2006 was Year B, 2007 was Year C, and so on. The Liturgical Year begins on the 1st Sunday of Advent (usually late November) and ends with the Feast of Christ the King.

In Year A, we read mostly from the gospel of Matthew. In Year B, we read the gospel of Mark and chapter 6 of the gospel of John. In Year C, we read the gospel of Luke. The gospel of John is read during the Easter season in all three years.

The first reading, usually from the Old Testament, reflects important themes from the gospel reading. The second reading is usually from one of the epistles, a letter written to an early church community. These letters are read semi-continuously. Each Sunday, we pick up close to where we left off the Sunday before, though some passages are never read.

The weekday cycle is divided into two years, Year I and Year II. Year I is read in odd-numbered years (2003, 2005, etc.) and Year II is used in even-numbered years (2002, 2004, etc.) The gospels for both years are the same. During the year, the gospels are read semi-continuously, beginning with Mark, then moving on to Matthew and Luke. The gospel of John is read during the Easter season. For Advent , Christmas, and Lent , readings are chosen that are appropriate to the season. The first reading on weekdays may be taken from the Old or the New Testament. Typically, a single book is read semi-continuously (i.e. some passages are not read) until it is finished and then a new book is started.

This year (2018) is Year B/II





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